Tag Archives: Fathers Day

My sister Mary posted this old picture of our parents on her facebook page last week. My dad was in the Seabees during World War II, building airstrips, barracks, bridges and the like in the Pacific Theatre. This photo was probably taken when he was on leave, early 1945, when I was conceived. I was born in November of that year, just a month or two after the war ended. I was an original baby boomer.

My parents grew up in a different time. Growing up I heard them say things like: “When I was your age:  we didn’t have indoor toilets … we had to pump water from a well … we had to milk cows and gather eggs before breakfast … we had to walk five miles to school.”  It all sounded like ancient history to me.

Now my history is ancient, too.

How many of these can you relate to?  They were all true when I was growing up:

  1. We couldn’t drive into town for a fast food meal because there were no fast food restaurants.
  2. Mothers  who worked outside the home were considered irresponsible.
  3. TV sets were considered furniture and they were available in black and white only.
  4. And it went off the air at midnight.
  5. And there were only 3 channels.
  6. Pizza was  called “Pizza Pie.”
  7. And it wasn’t delivered to your house.
  8. But milk was.
  9. And milk bottles had little cardboard stoppers in them.
  10. Newspapers were delivered by paper boys.
  11. There were no movie ratings because all movies were more or less G-rated.
  12. But Christians still didn’t go to them because they were “worldly.”
  13. Christians didn’t go to bowling alleys either.
  14. Or to school dances.
  15. But we could buy candy cigarettes.
  16. And little bottles of Coke made out of wax.
  17. Coke machines dispensed glass bottles.
  18. Music was purchased on 45 rpm records.
  19. Roller skates had keys.
  20. There was only one phone in the house.
  21. And it was on a “party line” so you had to make sure a neighbor wasn’t using it.
  22. We saved S&H Green Stamps.
  23. Nobody ever asked “paper or plastic?”
  24. We could take toy guns to school.
  25. Ice trays were made of metal.
  26. Cameras had blue flash bulbs.
  27. Clothes were dried on a clothesline.
  28. Wash tubs had wooden rollers for rinsing clothes.

Ancient history, indeed.  One of these days your life will become ancient history too. Enjoy it now … while you can!

 


Just returned from another Huck Finn’s Jubilee in Victorville which is how I have spent Father’s Day weekend for the past 20 years or so. I have been involved with this event either as a performer with my band Lighthouse or as the main stage emcee or both.  I also serve as a consultant to the show’s producer (helping with talent selection) each year and I host the Sunday morning chapel service which is where my two worlds (ministry and bluegrass) collide in a big way.

The festival went great this year with a large turnout and great weather. The idea of going to Victorville in June sometimes scares people away because they think it’s going to be too hot. But we have had moderate temperatures and cool nights for several years in a row now. The music was wonderful with outstanding performances by the likes of Sierra Hull, Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver, Rodney Dillard (of the Dillards), NewFound Road and Roy Clark. It was also great to spend the weekend with my wife, daughter Amber, and our three grandkids Nick, Maddie and Jack. They all had a good time.

I’m always amazed and a bit conflicted that I get to live in two completely different worlds. Throughout most of the year, I’m a pastor, serving on a church staff, doing rather mundane (yet significant I hope) ministry tasks. But on a weekend like the one I just had, I’m not a pastor but a bluegrass music insider, radio personality, stage announcer, friend and colleague to some of the most talented musicians on the planet. I’m amazed by it all and grateful to God that I get to do this.

But I got a quick return to reality when I got home Sunday night. The water supply to our home had been shut off by our neighbor because of a pipe break at the water meter on the street. I spent all day Monday getting it fixed and somehow strained a muscle in my back in the process. But the repair was made, the water is back on and except for the sore back, life is pretty much back to normal. See you next year, Mr. Twain.

 


Category: Bluegrass, Personal